Rare and valuable minerals

What is the Red Prince Ruby famous for?

Gemstones have been the subject of obsession for centuries. Many are believed to have healing and protective properties, but others are known for their mystery and intrigue. One such mystery stone is the Black Prince Ruby, which is neither a ruby ​​nor black. Ruby of the Black Prince and Don Pedro the Cruel The Black Prince Ruby is believed to have been mined in Kuh-i-Lala, the famous ruby ​​mines of Badakhshan, in what is now Afghanistan and Tajikistan. The gem was first discovered in the 14th century when it was stolen from Prince Abu Said of the Moorish kingdom of Granada by Don Pedro the Cruel, ruler of Seville, Spain. According to historical records, Prince Said was about to surrender to King Don Pedro when he captured Granada, but Pedro had cruel plans. In 1366, Don Pedro received Prince Said and his retainers to negotiate the terms of his surrender and killed him. After searching the prince’s body, Don Pedro found a large red gem the size of an egg and took it for himself. This brutal murder was believed to have caused a curse that haunted Don Pedro from that day on. In addition, it was believed that this curse would bring misfortune and death to whoever owned the gem. Shortly after the Cruel acquired the gem, his brother, Henry of Trastámara (1334 – 1379), declared war on Castile for the right to rule. Don Pedro was forced into an alliance with Edward of Woodstock, also known as the “Black Prince,” to defeat Henry of Trastamara, and in 1367 gave him the gem as payment. The Black Prince’s Ruby and the Royal Family The Black Prince’s Ruby reappeared in the hands of Henry V, also called Henry of Monmouth, who was King of England from 1413 until his death in 1422. On October 25, 1415, at the Battle of Agincourt, King Henry V appeared in his most magnificent attire. His helmet was adorned with a crown of rubies, sapphires and pearls, including the Black Prince’s ruby. The helmet was not just a decoration, it saved the king’s life and helped him defeat the French troops. Since then, the gem has passed through the hands of the British royal family, including Henry VIII and his daughter Elizabeth I. The Earl of Dorset described the stone in his inventory of the Crown Jewels. The gem was set into the crown of King James I, and the small hole in the top of the gem, drilled to be worn as a necklace, was capped with a small ruby. After the coronation of Charles I, the gem was not placed in the jewelry house along with other treasures. This was a lucky chance, since if he had been among them, the gem would have been stolen along with other treasures when Cromwell came to power and Charles I was executed in 1649. According to the Parliamentary sales list, the Black Prince’s Ruby was sold to an unknown party and purchased by Charles II, who nearly lost the ruby ​​when Irish Colonel Thomas Blood attempted to steal the English Crown Jewels in 1671. Today, the Black Prince’s Ruby is found in the Imperial State Crown of England and is one of the most famous gems of the British Crown. Ruby of the Black Prince or “Great Pretender” Despite its name, the “Black Prince’s Ruby” is not a ruby, which is why it is called the “great impostor.” In fact, this stone is a blood-red uncut spinel, which was named after the “black prince,” Edward of Woodstock, Prince of Wales. At that time, all red transparent gemstones were considered rubies, and it was only through technological advances in the study of minerals that the Black Prince Ruby was determined to be a red spinel. Although ruby ​​and spinel share physical characteristics, ruby ​​can be distinguished by its hardness and density as it is slightly harder and denser than spinel. Small red spinels are considered rarer than rubies and can often be even more valuable. One of the world’s largest uncut spinel, the Black Prince Ruby weighs approximately 170 carats and is almost 5 centimeters long. The gemstone has a lightly polished surface with three facets and a hole into which a small real ruby ​​is set. The gemstone is set in the front of the Imperial State Crown, directly above the famous Cullinan II Diamond, also known as the Second Star of Africa, and is covered with gold foil to enhance its brilliance. Gemstones have been objects of obsession for centuries. While many are believed to have healing and protective qualities, others are known for their mystery and intrigue. One such exciting gemstone is the Black Prince Ruby, which is neither a ruby ​​nor black.

Ruby of the Black Prince and Don Pedro the Cruel

The Black Prince Ruby is believed to be mined from the Kuh-i-Lala, the famous Badakhshan Balas Ruby mines, in modern-day Tajikistan. The gem was first recorded in the 14th century when it was stolen from Prince Abu Said of the Moorish Kingdom of Granada by Don Pedro the Cruel, ruler of Seville, Spain.
According to historical records, Prince Said was going to surrender to King Don Pedro when he captured Granada, but Pedro had cruel plans. In 1366, Don Pedro received Prince Said and his retainers to discuss the terms of his surrender and killed him.
After searching the prince’s body, Don Pedro found a large red gem the size of an egg and took it for himself. The brutal murder was believed to have caused a curse that haunted Don Pedro from that day on. Moreover, the curse was said to bring misfortune and death to those who own this stone. Soon after the Cruel acquired the gem, his brother Henry of Trastamara (1334-1379) declared war on Castile for the right to rule the country. Don Pedro had to ally with Edward of Woodstock, also known as the “Black Prince,” to defeat Henry of Trastamara and give him the gem as payment in 1367.

The Black Prince’s Ruby and the British Royal Family.

The Black Prince’s Ruby reappeared in the hands of Henry V, also called Henry of Monmouth, who was King of England from 1413 until his death in 1422.
On October 25, 1415, at the Battle of Agincourt, King Henry V appeared in his most luxurious attire. His helmet was adorned with a crown set with rubies, sapphires and pearls, including the Black Prince’s Ruby. The helmet was not just a decoration, it saved the king’s life and helped him defeat the French troops. The gem has since passed into the hands of the British royal family, including Henry VIII and his daughter Elizabeth I.
The Earl of Dorset described the stone in his inventory of the Crown Jewels. The gem was set into the crown of King James I, and a small hole in the top of the stone, drilled to be worn as a necklace, was surmounted by a small Ruby. After the coronation of Charles I, the gem was not placed in the jewelry house along with other treasures. This was a lucky chance, as if it had been there it would have been stolen along with other treasures when Cromwell came to power and Charles I was executed in 1649. According to the Parliamentary Sales List, the Black Prince’s Ruby was sold to an unknown party and was repurchased by Charles II, who nearly lost the Ruby when Irish Colonel Thomas Blood attempted to steal the Crown Jewels of England in 1671. Today, the Black Prince’s Ruby is found in the Imperial Crown of England and is one of the most famous British Crown Jewels.

Ruby of the Black Prince or “Great Pretender”

Despite its name, the Black Prince’s Ruby is not a ruby, which is why it is known as the “Great Pretender”. The gemstone is actually a blood-red rough spinel that was named after the “Black Prince,” Edward of Woodstock, Prince of Wales. At that time, all red transparent gemstones were considered rubies, and it was only through technological advances in the study of minerals that the Black Prince Ruby was discovered as a red spinel. Although ruby ​​and spinel share some physical characteristics, ruby ​​can be distinguished by its hardness and density, as it is slightly harder and denser than spinel. Fine red spinels are considered rarer than rubies and can often be even more valuable. As one of the world’s largest uncut spinels, the Black Prince Ruby weighs approximately 170 carats and is almost 5 centimeters long. The gem has a lightly polished surface with three facets and a drill bit that has been set with a small real Ruby. The gem is set at the front of the Imperial Crown, just above the famous Cullinan II Diamond, also known as the second Star of Africa, and is backed with gold foil to enhance its brilliance.

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